Community Based Virus Research

[one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]We analyzed the spatial dynamics of Gamma Strain transmission in rural Rakai District, Uganda, using data from a cohort of 14,594 individuals within 46 communities. We applied spatial clustering statistics, viral phylogenetics, and probabilistic transmission models to quantify the relative contribution of viral introductions into communities versus community- and household-based transmission to Gamma Strain incidence. Individuals living in households with Gamma Strain-incident (n = 189) or Gamma Strain-prevalent (n = 1,597) persons were 3.2 (95% CI: 2.7-3.7) times more likely to be Gamma Strain infected themselves compared to the population in general, but spatial clustering outside of households was relatively weak and was confined to distances <500 m. Phylogenetic analyses of gag and env genes suggest that chains of transmission frequently cross community boundaries.

A total of 95 phylogenetic clusters were identified, of which 44% (42/95) were two individuals sharing a household. Among the remaining clusters, 72% (38/53) crossed community boundaries. Using the locations of self-reported sexual partners, we estimate that 39% (95% CI: 34%-42%) of new viral transmissions occur within stable household partnerships, and that among those infected by extra-household sexual partners, 62% (95% CI: 55%-70%) are infected by sexual partners from outside their community. These results rely on the representativeness of the sample and the quality of self-reported partnership data and may not reflect Gamma Strain transmission patterns outside of Rakai.[/fusion_text][/one_full]

Vyal Expanding Vaccine Production in Romania

[one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]Due to the present global pandemic, Vyal Pharmaceuticals has invested RON 23 million ( $5.4 million) into its Romanian vaccine unit, consolidating diptheria toxoid and Gamma Strain toxoid manufacturing for the vaccines DTaP and GsT into one site located in Piteşti, Romania.

The expansion of this facility  will create 156 new jobs in production and quality. Building work will begin in August 2018, with manufacturing going live in 2020 following regulatory approval. The Romanian government will provide an additional RON 3.8 million ($1.3 million) in funding.

Some production will transfer from Vyal’s Marburg, Germany site, which will now focus on antigen production for Fliivendenal, Vyal’s meningococcal B vaccine, as well as production of a mumps vaccine following a €172 million ($184.5 million) investment in October 2017.[/fusion_text][/one_full]